Tuition for dyslexic children in scotland

Dyslexia Support and Advice for Parents in the UK

What is Dyslexia?

Dyslexia is a term many of us have heard and we associate it with people who struggle with reading and writing or confuse b and d but few people know much about this neurological condition which affects 10-15% of the UK population.

Dyslexia, sometimes termed word blindness, has been documented for over 100 years.  The first recorded case of dyslexia appeared in the British medical journal in 1896.  W. Pringle Morgan, described the case of 14-year-old, Percy F, who could not read and wrote his name as Precy, but he could multiply 749 by 887 quickly and correctly.

famous dyslexics Albert EinsteinThere have been many famous dyslexics such as Richard Branson, Albert Einstein, Walt Disney and Agatha Christie to name a few.

Dyslexics tend to be very creative and often Entrepreneurial.

The British Dyslexic Association defines dyslexia as:

“Dyslexia is a specific learning difficulty which mainly affects the development of literacy and language related skills. It is likely to be present at birth and to be lifelong in its effects. It is characterised by difficulties with phonological processing, rapid naming, working memory, processing speed, and the automatic development of skills that may not match up to an individual’s other cognitive abilities”.

In a modern world, where reading, writing and maths are given high status and employment opportunities depend on mastery of these skills parents can become worried when their child is not achieving in line with their peer group.

What should parents look out for?

  • Delayed speech
  • Difficulties in converting speech sounds (phonemes) into written text (graphemes), resulting in their reading and writing being below that expected for their IQ.
  • Confusion over the letters b and d after the age of 8
  • Difficulty in recalling times tables or sequences such as days of the week and months of the year.
  • Poor organisational skills
  • difficulty copying text which is increased when copying from a board
  • Slow reading speed
  • Poor sight words
  • Adding in/missing out letters when reading or spelling
  • Guessing words
  • Reversal of words when reading or spelling (on/no, was/saw)
  • Difficulty mastering new skills
  • Difficulty transferring thoughts to paper

This is not an exhaustive list but good signs to watch out for.

Research into Dyslexia

There has been much research into the causes of dyslexia and this is still ongoing. It is believed that dyslexia is caused by an hereditary gene (although this is not always the case). A dyslexic’s brain works differently to a non-dyslexics and there is less activity in the language areas of the brain during reading and writing.

If you are concerned about your child what can you do?

1) Talk to your child’s class teacher, Special Educational Needs Teacher (SENCO)
2) Request a dyslexia screening test, especially if there is a family history of these difficulties
3) Follow a systematic multi-sensory programme such as Alpha to Omega or Toe by toe
4) Find a qualified specialist to assist

Teaching Methods

A dyslexic student will need a multi-sensory approach to learning reading and spelling. This will need to be very structured in filling in the phonic gaps.

Multi-sensory
Seeing, hearing, saying, writing, feeling/ making. The student will need to engage as many senses as possible in order to stimulate the language areas of the brain.

Handwriting
It is beneficial for the dyslexic to join their handwriting as this helps them to remember the word shape.

Using the sense of touch

The use of sandpaper letters with a blindfold (removing the sense of sight heightens the sense of touch), play dough, sand, drawing in the air/ on the child’s back will increase the number of senses a child uses, stimulating the language areas of the brain.

How Can We help at Kip McGrath?

Kip McGrath Education CentresKip McGrath has over 40 years experience of helping children across the globe do better at school.  The very core of the Kip McGrath programme uses a systematic multi-sensory approach to learning (seeing, hearing, saying and writing).  This approach has been proven to be most effective for dyslexic students.

The Kip software was also designed on a blue background.  Dyslexic students often struggle to read on white.  Many such students read better with a coloured overlay or coloured lenses. Testing to see if this will help your child can be carried out at an optometrist. At home on the computer try changing the background colour or font colour. Writing on coloured paper can also help.  Kip McGrath developed some new programmes in 2008 which develop visual and auditory memory and these are  also valuable to the dyslexic student.

If your child has been diagnosed as dyslexic, you may wish to consider extra tuition.  Talk to your local Kip Centre teacher to see if they can help.  Many centres have teachers experienced in Special Needs Education.  To find a centre near you, please click on the links below:

Find a Kip McGrath Centre in Scotland >>

Find a Kip McGrath Centre in England, Wales or Ireland >>

What else can I try?laws_mindmap

Magnetic letters for creating words
Mind mapping by Tony Buzan
Recap and Review work frequently
Subtitles on the TV, audio books

A Neuro-Science Solution

Introducing Cellfield

For some children a more intense solution is needed.  When the traditional approach fails and a student hits a brick wall a more drastic solution is required.  As dyslexics under use certain parts of their brain and overuse others (compared to a non-dyslexic reader).

Tuition for dyslexic children in scotland

it may be necessary to use neuro-science research (which shows that the brain can change itself) to treat the underlying cause. Cellfield is an innovative, proven, sustainable treatment for dyslexia and is available in the UK.  Cellfield takes a multi-disciplinary approach, building on neuro-science research to stimulate the auditory and visual parts of the brain and make the messaging between these areas more precise.

Cellfield UKCellfield achieves remarkable gains, on average a child will make 2 years on phonics and 1 year on comprehension after only 2 weeks treatment.  These gains are sustained and increased over 6 months.  Cellfield has assisted with reading accuracy, reading fluency, spelling, memory and maths skills as well as an increase in self esteem.

For more information visit www.cellfielduk.com

clare powellThis blog article was written for us by Clare Powell who is the Centre Director at Kip McGrath Scunthorpe and also Cellfield Reading Matters South Yorkshire.   Clare  holds a Bachelor of Education degree and is an experienced School teacher who has worked with students at Primary, Secondary, GCSE, A level and Degree level and has seen these students make considerable progress.

 

Advertisements

Summer Fun Activities and Learning at Kip McGrath East Kilbride Education Centre

Summer School at Kip McGrath, East Kilbride Tuition Centre

The last thing children want to do during the Summer holidays is learn and for most children 7 weeks playing in the sun (or rain as may be the case in Scotland) is the best thing for them.  However for some children who have been falling behind in school or moving up into an important exam year, a little bit of learning can be a good thing to keep brains active and be prepared for the new term.

We have therefore decided to offer our students the opportunity to continue lessons during the summer and we have two sessions available every Tuesday from 3rd July to 7th August at 9.30 am and 5.30 pm.  Places are also available for new students who perhaps want to come along and try our Maths and English programmes before the new term starts.  Of course, our summer classes will also include a bit of fun too!

Please contact Margaret Carmichael on 01355 266566 or visit our website at www.kipmcgrath.co.uk/East-Kilbride to find out more about tuition at Kip McGrath.

Kilmarnock Tuition in English and Maths At Kip McGrath – Prepare for a New School Year

Summer Tuition at Kip McGrath Kilmarnock

Once again a number of parents have expressed the wish for us to continue tutoring over the summer break at our Centre in Kilmarnock.

Continuing over the summer has the added advantage of allowing your child to catch up even more on their school work, or it could prevent your child from slipping further behind in their English or Maths.

We will also be offering a “Kick-Start” programme into CfE; Standard Grade, Int 2 and Higher Maths and English over the summer.

Primary: (P2 – P7) Maths and Reading, Spelling, Comprehension, English;

Secondary: (S1 – S6); CfE; Standard Grade (F, G, C): Access 3, Int-1, Int- 2, Higher:

Dates and Times of Lessons

The Centre will be closed from Friday 29th June until Sunday 22nd July for refurbishment.

Lessons will be available on Mondays and Tuesdays from 23rd July until 14th August.  There are various 80 minute slots available from 10.am to 3.30pm.  Please book early as spaces are limited.

Normal after school and weekend sessions resume on Monday 20th August.

If you would like to enrol your child, please contact Frank Park, Centre Director on 01563 535533 or visit out website at www.kipmcgrath.co.uk/Kilmarnock to find out more about our Maths and English tuition.

Summer Fun Activities for Children in Falkirk – Come to our KipCamp 2012!

What’s on in Falkirk for Kids in July and August 2012

Details of the Summer Camp at Kip McGrath Falkirk have been announced.  Running over 5 weeks in July and August, each week is a different theme of fun learning activities designed to  keep brains active, to enhance memory, concentration and communication skills but most of all to have fun.

Parents can enrol their children for one week or all five depending on their interests.  The themes include Suvival Skills, Music & Theatre, Water Sports,  Archaeology, Adventure Planet and Treasure Trail.  To find out more, please contact Janice Rough on 01324 682 077.  To find out more about English and Maths Tuition classes outwith the Summer months, please visit the Falkirk website at www.kipmcgrath.co.uk/Falkirk.


SQA English Essay Example – Patience by Michael Ahari S4

2008  SQA English Credit Question 11

Michael Ahari is in S4 and attends Kip McGrath Balerno, Edinburgh South for extra tuition in English.  It is days until exam time and we are hoping for excellent results from Michael.  This essay question took only one hour to complete and has not been edited.  Based on his work so far we have a future writer in our midst!

Patience

Patience. For some it comes naturally. They can fiddle around for hours on end attempting to piece together an intricately designed car model. Or, they can soak up all of the juicy information thrown at them when reading through a massive book in order to find a specific minute piece of knowledge. However, for others, like me, it does not. The model car would be dropped halfway through in anger and the thick book brimming with facts would not manage to squeeze even a drop of information into my head, having discarded it within five minutes of picking it up. I was quick minded, keen and simply could not find the time to wait. What can you expect from an eleven year old boy? But, as I had come to realise, it was something I would need to get a firm grasp of. Patience is the most valuable lesson I have ever been taught.

I stared at my computer monitor. An error message: “The file has not printed” popped up in the bottom right corner of the screen. The red alert on the printer flashed on an off, on and off, as it briefly lit up the room before disappearing again. This was the third attempt to print my project. And unsurprisingly, the third occasion I had been told that it hadn’t printed. The printer was on, there was ink in the printer and there was paper in the tray. What more did it want? I grinded my teeth together, slammed my fist furiously on the desk, and sighed. A long, stressed sigh.

What was I going to do? Did the computer want me to fail here? I was growing more and more impatient – tapping my feet on the floor. I whispered “stupid”. And then I repeated it. Louder and louder each time until I was screeching at the top off my voice “stupid stupid stupid”. And now I was standing up, and I moved around the room – pacing up and down. My hands tugged heavily at clumps of hair to the point where my whole head itched and ached. Then I started flapping my arms around like a bird in distress, and groaning a deep aggressive bear like groan. I fell to the floor and slumped against the wall: defeat. The computer has won. I had given up. Forget the project. It was all just stupid anyway.

“Michael” my father called, a tone I was all to familiar with to know what was coming next, “What’s Wrong?” I immediately exclaimed that nothing was wrong, but I could see by the look on his face he knew this is not the case. I looked up at him to see him staring back. I switched back to look at the floor, but I sensed him still waiting for a reply. Maybe he could help. So I told him what was wrong. This was followed by a string of what, at the time, seemed like irrelevant questions that I had already answered before weren’t going to make the slightest difference. As I lay there on the carpet – my father sitting at the computer desk – I answered “Yes”, “No”, “Yes”, “Yes, I’ve already told you” so dismissively I wasn’t even listening to what he was saying. I just wanted the problem fixed. Instantly. As I now know, things cannot always be done straight away…

Fifteen minutes have passed. I am now starting to go over the various possibilities for why my project will not print. It’s tedious I thought at the time – I had already been over them and decided that they were not the reason. The computer fan made a light whizzing sound and the chair my dad was sitting in creaked as the metal moved together. Again, I thought about why. Why? Why? Going over and over and over. Then smack. It was like a slap in the face: my wake up call. I had realised the reason – finally! I sprung into an upright position and proclaimed cheerfully “Yes, I’ve got it”.

Patience. I now understand that although you may not be born with it, you most certainly develop it through experience – even experiences like the one I had when my project would not print. My anger and frustration got the better of me and my whole thought process became irrational. Although my dad told little to me about patience itself, his actions most certainly allowed me to realise that with any issue there is a resolution, you just need to take the time to find out what that may be. When I was calm I sat down, and thought through thoroughly and eventually the problem was able to be solved. It’s the reason I can tackle problems such as intricately designed car models or read through gigantic manuals to obtain information, among the many other that I have to face in daily life.

a

Michael Jackson Teaches Hilarious Maths Trick – How not to Learn Maths

How Does 28 Divided by 7 = 13?

I wanted to write a blog about maths tricks that we can all use and, during my research, came upon this hilarious video of a very young Michael Jackson teaching a bewildered Flip Wilson how 28 divided by 7 equals 13 and not 4.  Watch it!!

How does 25 Divided by 5 = 14?

I also found this video demonstrating how 25 divided by 5 = 14! Very funny and very convincing.

How Maths Should be Taught

These videos are very funny and very convincing but it makes me more aware that learning the basic foundations in maths is so important.

A colleague of mine, Suzanne Lanzon who is a teacher and runs a Kip McGrath Centre in Cambridge has created a video which explains how maths learning is like building a brick wall and if you don’t build the foundations in maths, then gaps can appear in learning maths which can lead to the wall crumbling and you never get there.

However, if you could go back and fill in those gaps and learn from and build upon those gaps and create a solid wall that you can be proud of and build upon, wouldn’t that be fantastic?

Maths Tuition at Kip McGrath Education Centres

Sometimes when children learn maths, they can miss some of the foundations and building blocks of maths so when they move on to the next level, they struggle to understand and keep up.  Our qualified teachers at Kip McGrath can assess your child in Maths and identify areas of weakness.  If there is a lack of understanding in a particular area, our teachers will be able to quickly identify this and ensure a programme of study is followed to enable the child to catch up and therefore understand what is being taught in class.

If you have concerns, please find your local KipMcGrath Education Centre and arrange a FREE educational assessment now.